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SILVER MEDAL TFP AWARDS 2003 ANTONI CLAVÉID32303437

SILVER MEDAL TFP AWARDS 2003 ANTONI CLAVÉ

€328.00   (TAX incl.)

€271.07   (Taxes not incl.)

19  In Stock
Clavé was born in Barcelona in 1913 and trained at the School of Fine Arts of San Jorge (Barcelona), under Ángel Ferrant, Félix Mestres y José Mongrell. He began to make his mark during the 30's in the field of advertising by doing posters and illustration. In 1939 he settled in Paris (hence his inclusion in the "Second Paris School") where he devoted himself to the creation of theatre sets. At the same time he made use of his experience in poster work and collage to produce some very individualistic lithographs, some widely differing assemblages and some sculpture.

His painting, clearly influenced in its beginnings by Bonnard and the "blue period" Picasso, underwent a more personal phase after meeting Picasso in 1944 and began to feature monumental figures. His work evolved to verge on abstraction where he functioned with an ease of performance born of the technical virtuosity acquired by his constant research into materials in both painting and engraving.

If his series executed in the fifties were based on a violent clash of color in which black and red were combined, along with the intentional matter-painting effects, from then on his compositions became more simplified whilst also becoming more harsh, the chromatic range being restricted and anything superfluous eliminated. These characteristics were also applicable to his sculptural work in bronze and other materials. Around 1960 Clavé completed a series of very expressive anthropomorphic sculptures from unusual materials like lead. From 1974 on he experienced a stage of greater austerity which redounded in large format works on paper, cardstock or wood, in which the artist seemed to avoid the inclusion of color.

In Clavé's later years his work became totally abstract, pursuing the refinement of formal designs. His paintings, sculptures and engravings are exhibited in leading museums worldwide and have received awards such as the Hallmark award (1949), The Matarasso award at the 4th Biennial of Sao Paulo (1957), the UNESCO award at the Biennial in Venice in 1954, and the Kamakura Museum award from the International Biennial in Tokyo in 1957.
Information about the Medal
Year 2003  
Diameter (mm) 60  
Metal SILVER  
Weight (g) 110  
Maximum Mintage (units) 40  

Clavé was born in Barcelona in 1913 and trained at the School of Fine Arts of San Jorge (Barcelona), under Ángel Ferrant, Félix Mestres y José Mongrell. He began to make his mark during the 30's in the field of advertising by doing posters and illustration. In 1939 he settled in Paris (hence his inclusion in the "Second Paris School") where he devoted himself to the creation of theatre sets. At the same time he made use of his experience in poster work and collage to produce some very individualistic lithographs, some widely differing assemblages and some sculpture.

His painting, clearly influenced in its beginnings by Bonnard and the "blue period" Picasso, underwent a more personal phase after meeting Picasso in 1944 and began to feature monumental figures. His work evolved to verge on abstraction where he functioned with an ease of performance born of the technical virtuosity acquired by his constant research into materials in both painting and engraving.

If his series executed in the fifties were based on a violent clash of color in which black and red were combined, along with the intentional matter-painting effects, from then on his compositions became more simplified whilst also becoming more harsh, the chromatic range being restricted and anything superfluous eliminated. These characteristics were also applicable to his sculptural work in bronze and other materials. Around 1960 Clavé completed a series of very expressive anthropomorphic sculptures from unusual materials like lead. From 1974 on he experienced a stage of greater austerity which redounded in large format works on paper, cardstock or wood, in which the artist seemed to avoid the inclusion of color.

In Clavé's later years his work became totally abstract, pursuing the refinement of formal designs. His paintings, sculptures and engravings are exhibited in leading museums worldwide and have received awards such as the Hallmark award (1949), The Matarasso award at the 4th Biennial of Sao Paulo (1957), the UNESCO award at the Biennial in Venice in 1954, and the Kamakura Museum award from the International Biennial in Tokyo in 1957.