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SILVER MEDAL TFP AWARDS 2001 BARJOLAID32303426

SILVER MEDAL TFP AWARDS 2001 BARJOLA

€328.00   (TAX incl.)

€271.07   (Taxes not incl.)

7  In Stock
Barjola was born in 1920 in Torre de Miguel Sesmero, Badajoz. In due course he enrolled in the School of Arts and Crafts in the town of Badajoz, and in 1943 he moved to Madrid, where he became a pupil of the San Fernando School of Fine Arts and practiced drawing at the Círculo de Bellas Artes. En 1957 he held his first solo exhibition in the Gallery Abril in Madrid, after which he would exhibit regularly in the main art galleries of the capital city. The major galleries in these beginnings were the Ateneo (1960 y 1965) and the exhibition rooms of the General Directorate of Fine Arts (1963).

His painting has frequently been described as following a dramatic, typically Spanish, course (influenced by the Baroque, by the Black Paintings of Goya and by the most visceral of Solana's). His style is rooted in expressionism with a slight surrealist influence, brought about by his direct contact with the avant-garde as a consequence of a European scholarship granted to him in 1960 by the Juan March Foundation. In the fifties he had mixed cubism and impressionism. The violently dramatic quality in the execution of his paintings indicates that he was aware of the informalist and abstract expressionist trends, these becoming more noticeable in his work during the sixties and seventies, which motivated the art critics of the day to include it in the sub-group of critical realism.

His paintings are full of color and chromatic contrast, it being the gestural strokes in his drawings and the complex composition that capture the anguish and the drama of his characters, whether they be dogs or prostitutes, little girls or bullfighters. His paintings, inhabited by ambiguous and deformed beings, reflect in their distorted shapes the contrasts and the inequities generated by society, a world marked by violence, suffering and humiliation, but always regarded through the prism of ethical depth and compassion.

This violence becomes softened, without disappearing altogether, in the bullfighting scenes he did in the eighties, where a brighter palette and a freer brushstroke make for greater plastic elegance.

The many awards he has received throughout his career include the Critics Award (1965), a First Medal in Painting at the National Fine Arts Exhibition, the National Fine Arts Award (1985) and the Medal of Extremadura (1991). In 1988 the Juan Barjola Art Museum was founded in Gijón in appreciation of a donation of his work.
Information about the Medal
Year 2001  
Diameter (mm) 60  
Metal SILVER  
Weight (g) 151  
Maximum Mintage (units) 40  

Barjola was born in 1920 in Torre de Miguel Sesmero, Badajoz. In due course he enrolled in the School of Arts and Crafts in the town of Badajoz, and in 1943 he moved to Madrid, where he became a pupil of the San Fernando School of Fine Arts and practiced drawing at the Círculo de Bellas Artes. En 1957 he held his first solo exhibition in the Gallery Abril in Madrid, after which he would exhibit regularly in the main art galleries of the capital city. The major galleries in these beginnings were the Ateneo (1960 y 1965) and the exhibition rooms of the General Directorate of Fine Arts (1963).

His painting has frequently been described as following a dramatic, typically Spanish, course (influenced by the Baroque, by the Black Paintings of Goya and by the most visceral of Solana's). His style is rooted in expressionism with a slight surrealist influence, brought about by his direct contact with the avant-garde as a consequence of a European scholarship granted to him in 1960 by the Juan March Foundation. In the fifties he had mixed cubism and impressionism. The violently dramatic quality in the execution of his paintings indicates that he was aware of the informalist and abstract expressionist trends, these becoming more noticeable in his work during the sixties and seventies, which motivated the art critics of the day to include it in the sub-group of critical realism.

His paintings are full of color and chromatic contrast, it being the gestural strokes in his drawings and the complex composition that capture the anguish and the drama of his characters, whether they be dogs or prostitutes, little girls or bullfighters. His paintings, inhabited by ambiguous and deformed beings, reflect in their distorted shapes the contrasts and the inequities generated by society, a world marked by violence, suffering and humiliation, but always regarded through the prism of ethical depth and compassion.

This violence becomes softened, without disappearing altogether, in the bullfighting scenes he did in the eighties, where a brighter palette and a freer brushstroke make for greater plastic elegance.

The many awards he has received throughout his career include the Critics Award (1965), a First Medal in Painting at the National Fine Arts Exhibition, the National Fine Arts Award (1985) and the Medal of Extremadura (1991). In 1988 the Juan Barjola Art Museum was founded in Gijón in appreciation of a donation of his work.