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PICASSO (2023) OUNCE "WOMAN IN BLUE"ID92937014

PICASSO (2023) OUNCE "WOMAN IN BLUE"

€96.80  

€80.00   (Taxes not incl.)

163  In Stock

 

On the occasion of the commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of Pablo Ruiz Picasso, the National Mint and Stamp Factory dedicates a collection of commemorative coins to the Spanish painter, the inimitable creator of the various currents that revolutionized the visual arts of the 20th century.

On the reverse is a reproduction of the work titled "Woman in Blue", made by Pablo Picasso in 1901, which is kept in the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, in Madrid.

On the obverse a detail of the Portrait of Pablo Picasso in a white sweater in his studio Le Fournas, Vallauris, taken by the photographer Edward Quinn in 1953, is reproduced.

Information about the Coin
Shape Square  
Series Picasso Fiftieth Anniversary  
Year 2023  
Colour Yes  
Quality Proof  
Face Value (Euro) 10
Size (mm) 36 X 36  
Alloy (‰) 999  
Metal Silver  
Weight (g) 31.41  
Maximum Mintage (units) 10,000  

"WOMAN IN BLUE" PICASSO (2023) OUNCE

Between January and May 1901, after a first stay in Paris the previous year, Picasso settled in Madrid. There he coincides with the writers and artists of the generation of '98, with whom he collaborates in the magazine Arte Joven of which he himself was artistic director. During those months, in addition to the illustrations for the magazine, the artist made a series of portraits of courtesans with multiple references ranging from modernism - which he had known in Barcelona - to Van Gogh, Toulouse Lautrec or the brushwork of El Greco and even Velázquez, from whom he borrows the composition of his portrait of Mariana of Austria.

Picasso sent Woman in Blue to the General Exhibition of Fine Arts in Madrid that year, where she went unnoticed. Before the exhibition ended he had already left Madrid to prepare for his first individual show in Paris. The work would be forgotten and would not be rescued until decades later, when it became part of the then National Museum of Modern Art.