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HISTORY OF NAVIGATION - THIRD ISSUEID32897052

HISTORY OF NAVIGATION - THIRD ISSUE

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The Royal Mint of Spain presents a series of coins dedicated to the "History of Navigation".

These series reproduce a selection of vessels that, for one reason or another, have been relevant over time.

It consists of twenty coins.
Four of them were launched in 2018 and the remaining sixteen in 2019, in four issues.

The third issue is made up of the following coins:
Caravel, 17th century Spanish Galley, 14th century Ship and Spanish LHD Juan Carlos I.
Information about the Coin
Series History Of Navigation  
Year 2019  
Colour Yes  
Maximum Mintage (units) 10,000  

History of Navigation - Third Issue

 

CARAVEL
Period: From the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries.
Length: between 20 m and 25 m
Length-to-beam ratio: 3:1.
Propulsion: Sails.
Description: In the fifteenth century, Portugal and Castile commenced their overseas expansion with the caravel. While there are some references dating back to the thirteenth century, this vessel reached its peak in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. It would seem that its name derives from the Arabic gârib (carabid), used to refer to a Byzantine vessel. The Portuguese imported it from the Moslems and Prince Henry the Navigator enhanced the structure of the Moslem hull and sails with European techniques and methods. The result was a vessel which, while of the same construction as those then being used in Europe, differed in design and rigging.

SPANISH GALLEY. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
Period: From the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.
Length: 40 m Beam: 6 m
Draught: from 2 to 3 m.
Propulsion: Sails and oars.
Weaponry: Ram (the usual weapon for charging at the enemy), artillery and troops’ weapons (harquebus).
Description: Used over a longer period than any other vessel, the galley was the main component of the war fleets in the Mediterranean. With references dating back to the times of Homer, the galley was in use from Antiquity (biremes and triremes) to the early nineteenth century.

SAILING VESSEL. FOURTEENTH CENTURY
Period: From the thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries.
Length: 15 to 25 m Beam: 5 to 8 m.
Propulsion: Sails.
Description: In view of the activity in the Atlantic Ocean during the fourteenth century, the Europeans, not least the Portuguese and the Castilians, realised that, to sail in such deep, rough waters, more robust vessels than those used in the Mediterranean would be required.

AMPHIBIOUS AIRCRAFT CARRIER JUAN CARLOS I
Period: Commissioned in the Spanish Royal Navy since September 30 2008.
Length: 231 m Beam: 32 m.
Propulsion: Two 11 MW electric engines providing a maximum speed of 21.5 knots.
Weaponry: Four 12.7 mm machine guns for close-quarter defence.
Description: Built in Ferrol to a proprietary design by Navantia, this vessel is similar to the American Tarawa class. Amphibious capacity, with a sinkable dike and careening site; and air capacity, with a flight deck and hangar. It is, therefore, of the LHD (Landing Helicopter Dock) type.