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TREASURES MUSEUMS (2014) VAN DYCK SILVER COINID92847012

 TREASURES MUSEUMS (2014) VAN DYCK SILVER COIN

€60.50   (TAX incl.)

€50.00   (Taxes not incl.)

Moses and the Brazen Serpent
This dramatic scene, taken from the Old Testament (Numbers 21, 5-9), conveys the moment in which Moses saves his people from the serpents sent by God as punishment for their lack of faith. All those bitten by the reptiles are healed by looking upon the bronze serpent set on a pole, symbolizing salvation. It is a symbol presaging Christ crucified who brings forgiveness to mankind and triumphs over the deadly serpent of Original Sin.
Sir Endymion Porter and Anton van Dyck Endymion Porter (1587-1649), guardian and friend of Van Dyck, was the secretary of the Duke of Buckingham and an important diplomat at the English court. A great devotee of the arts, he was commissioned to acquire paintings for the collection of King Carlos I, and was one of the finest sponsors of the artist during his sojourn in London.
The aristocrat appears facing front and dressed in white satin, whilst the painter, in black, is placed in profile and lower down so as not to overshadow the figure of the aristocrat. The outstanding nature of this double portrait is borne out by the strong affectionate relationship that existed between painter and patron and is visually reinforced by the position of their hands on a rock as a symbol of the strength of his friendship.
Anton van Dyck (Antwerp, 22 March, 1599 - London, 9 December, 1641) was a Flemish painter chiefly dedicated to portrait painting. As a result of attaining fame internationally, his name was adapted to different languages: in English, Sir Anthony van Dyck; in Spanish, Antonio or Antón van Dick. In his mother tongue, Dutch, his name is Anton Van Dijck (the word dijck means 'oak' or 'holm oak'). He became the leading court painter in England after a protracted stay in Italy, where he had occasion to see and copy some Renaissance master works, especially those of his favorite painter, Titian.
Van Dyck is universally known for his portraits of the Genovese nobility and for those he painted of Carlos I, the King of England and the members of his family and court. In addition to the portraits which brought him esteem, he also addressed biblical and mythological themes and introduced some striking pictorial innovations.
Copyright Madrid Museo Nacional del Prado
Information about the Coin
Series 2ND SERIE SPANISH MUSEUMS TREASURES  
Denomination 8 REALES  
Year 2014  
Quality PROOF  
Diameter (mm) 40  
Face Value (Euro) 10
Alloy (‰) 925  
Metal SILVER  
Weight (g) 27  
Maximum Mintage (units) 7,500  

Moses and the Brazen Serpent
This dramatic scene, taken from the Old Testament (Numbers 21, 5-9), conveys the moment in which Moses saves his people from the serpents sent by God as punishment for their lack of faith. All those bitten by the reptiles are healed by looking upon the bronze serpent set on a pole, symbolizing salvation. It is a symbol presaging Christ crucified who brings forgiveness to mankind and triumphs over the deadly serpent of Original Sin.
Sir Endymion Porter and Anton van Dyck Endymion Porter (1587-1649), guardian and friend of Van Dyck, was the secretary of the Duke of Buckingham and an important diplomat at the English court. A great devotee of the arts, he was commissioned to acquire paintings for the collection of King Carlos I, and was one of the finest sponsors of the artist during his sojourn in London.
The aristocrat appears facing front and dressed in white satin, whilst the painter, in black, is placed in profile and lower down so as not to overshadow the figure of the aristocrat. The outstanding nature of this double portrait is borne out by the strong affectionate relationship that existed between painter and patron and is visually reinforced by the position of their hands on a rock as a symbol of the strength of his friendship.
Anton van Dyck (Antwerp, 22 March, 1599 - London, 9 December, 1641) was a Flemish painter chiefly dedicated to portrait painting. As a result of attaining fame internationally, his name was adapted to different languages: in English, Sir Anthony van Dyck; in Spanish, Antonio or Antón van Dick. In his mother tongue, Dutch, his name is Anton Van Dijck (the word dijck means 'oak' or 'holm oak'). He became the leading court painter in England after a protracted stay in Italy, where he had occasion to see and copy some Renaissance master works, especially those of his favorite painter, Titian.
Van Dyck is universally known for his portraits of the Genovese nobility and for those he painted of Carlos I, the King of England and the members of his family and court. In addition to the portraits which brought him esteem, he also addressed biblical and mythological themes and introduced some striking pictorial innovations.
Copyright Madrid Museo Nacional del Prado