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TREASURES MUSEUMS (2014) EL GRECO SILVER COINID92847013

 TREASURES MUSEUMS (2014) EL GRECO SILVER COIN

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€50.00   (Taxes not incl.)

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The Disrobing is a work painted by El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1541-1614) for the Sacristy of the Cathedral of Toledo. It was completed between 1577 and 1579 and it still hangs in the Sacristy of the Cathedral of Toledo, Spain. In 2013 it was restored in the workshops of the Prado Museum.
According to Cossío, this is the artist's most poetic painting and the most exalted in expression, representing a peak moment in his production.
It is one of El Greco's first works in Toledo, together with the altarpiece paintings for Santo Domingo el Antiguo, when he had recently relocated from Italy.
The theme of the paintingThe Disrobing, commissioned by the town council, is the initial moment of the Passion in which Jesus is divested of his clothing. The painter was inspired by a text written by Saint Bonaventure. At lower left he places the Virgin Mary, Mary Magdalene and Maria Cleofas, whilst most of the group that escorted Jesus are positioned in the upper part of the painting, above the head of Christ.
The town council did not accept this work, considering that it contained inappropriateness that obscured history and devalued Christ, and finding it theologically unjustifiable that the heads of the escorts would be shown higher than that of Christ.
The Holy Trinity
The Everlasting Father, wearing an Eastern-style mitre, holds the body of Christ in his lap. Above his head appears the dove of the Holy Spirit, while six youthful angels surround the subject. Cherubim are depicted at the feet of Jesus and beneath the cloak of God the Father.
Based on an engraving by Albrecht Durer, this is one of the first commissioned pieces that El Greco undertook in Toledo. The artist balances the concepts of drawing and of color developed, respectively, from his Roman and Venetian perceptions. The different colors of the robes emphasize the range of contrasts in his palette, which links up with that of Tintoretto. Resonances of Michelangelo's work can also be perceived in the vigorously-portrayed anatomy of Jesus.
The work was painted for the upper tier of the altarpiece in the Convent Church of Santo Domingo el Antiguo in Toledo. It was commissioned by Diego de Castilla, the Dean of Toledo and executor of the will of María de Silva who was buried in the convent. It was acquired in 1832 by Fernando VII from the sculptor Valeriano Salvatierra.
El Greco
Doménikos Theotokópoulos, (Candía, 1541 - Toledo, 1614), known as El Greco, was a painter of the late Renaissance who developed a very personal style in the works of his mature years.
He lived his first 26 years in Crete, where he was a valued master of icon painting in the Post-Byzantine style that was current on the island. He later spent ten years becoming a Renaissance painter in Italy, first in Venice, where he wholly adopted the style of Titian and Tintoretto, and later in Rome, where he studied Michelangelo's Mannerism. In 1577 he settled in Toledo (Spain) where he was to live and work for the remainder of his life.
His work consists of large canvases intended for altarpieces in churches, numerous devotional paintings for religious institutions -in which the artists employed in his workshop often participated- and a group of portraits regarded as of the highest standard. His first Spanish masterpieces reveal the influence of his Italian teachers. He would, however, evolve towards a personal style characterized by his extraordinarily elongated Mannerist figures with their own radiance, lean, ghostly and very expressive, disposed in undefined settings and executed in a range of colors that sought to create contrasts. This style identified with the spirit of the Counter-Reformation and became still more extreme in his later years.
Today he is considered to be one of the greatest artists of Western civilization. This high regard is recent and has been shaped gradually over the course of the last hundred years, changing the appreciation that was held of his painting in the two and a half centuries that followed his death, during which period he was close to being considered an eccentric painter and of marginal significance in the history of art.
Information about the Coin
Series 2ND SERIE SPANISH MUSEUMS TREASURES  
Denomination 8 REALES  
Year 2014  
Quality PROOF  
Diameter (mm) 40  
Face Value (Euro) 10
Alloy (‰) 925  
Metal SILVER  
Weight (g) 27  
Maximum Mintage (units) 7,500  

The Disrobing is a work painted by El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1541-1614) for the Sacristy of the Cathedral of Toledo. It was completed between 1577 and 1579 and it still hangs in the Sacristy of the Cathedral of Toledo, Spain. In 2013 it was restored in the workshops of the Prado Museum.
According to Cossío, this is the artist's most poetic painting and the most exalted in expression, representing a peak moment in his production.
It is one of El Greco's first works in Toledo, together with the altarpiece paintings for Santo Domingo el Antiguo, when he had recently relocated from Italy.
The theme of the paintingThe Disrobing, commissioned by the town council, is the initial moment of the Passion in which Jesus is divested of his clothing. The painter was inspired by a text written by Saint Bonaventure. At lower left he places the Virgin Mary, Mary Magdalene and Maria Cleofas, whilst most of the group that escorted Jesus are positioned in the upper part of the painting, above the head of Christ.
The town council did not accept this work, considering that it contained inappropriateness that obscured history and devalued Christ, and finding it theologically unjustifiable that the heads of the escorts would be shown higher than that of Christ.
The Holy Trinity
The Everlasting Father, wearing an Eastern-style mitre, holds the body of Christ in his lap. Above his head appears the dove of the Holy Spirit, while six youthful angels surround the subject. Cherubim are depicted at the feet of Jesus and beneath the cloak of God the Father.
Based on an engraving by Albrecht Durer, this is one of the first commissioned pieces that El Greco undertook in Toledo. The artist balances the concepts of drawing and of color developed, respectively, from his Roman and Venetian perceptions. The different colors of the robes emphasize the range of contrasts in his palette, which links up with that of Tintoretto. Resonances of Michelangelo's work can also be perceived in the vigorously-portrayed anatomy of Jesus.
The work was painted for the upper tier of the altarpiece in the Convent Church of Santo Domingo el Antiguo in Toledo. It was commissioned by Diego de Castilla, the Dean of Toledo and executor of the will of María de Silva who was buried in the convent. It was acquired in 1832 by Fernando VII from the sculptor Valeriano Salvatierra.
El Greco
Doménikos Theotokópoulos, (Candía, 1541 - Toledo, 1614), known as El Greco, was a painter of the late Renaissance who developed a very personal style in the works of his mature years.
He lived his first 26 years in Crete, where he was a valued master of icon painting in the Post-Byzantine style that was current on the island. He later spent ten years becoming a Renaissance painter in Italy, first in Venice, where he wholly adopted the style of Titian and Tintoretto, and later in Rome, where he studied Michelangelo's Mannerism. In 1577 he settled in Toledo (Spain) where he was to live and work for the remainder of his life.
His work consists of large canvases intended for altarpieces in churches, numerous devotional paintings for religious institutions -in which the artists employed in his workshop often participated- and a group of portraits regarded as of the highest standard. His first Spanish masterpieces reveal the influence of his Italian teachers. He would, however, evolve towards a personal style characterized by his extraordinarily elongated Mannerist figures with their own radiance, lean, ghostly and very expressive, disposed in undefined settings and executed in a range of colors that sought to create contrasts. This style identified with the spirit of the Counter-Reformation and became still more extreme in his later years.
Today he is considered to be one of the greatest artists of Western civilization. This high regard is recent and has been shaped gradually over the course of the last hundred years, changing the appreciation that was held of his painting in the two and a half centuries that followed his death, during which period he was close to being considered an eccentric painter and of marginal significance in the history of art.