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CATALOGUE OF ANTONIO SAURAID91302024

CATALOGUE OF ANTONIO SAURA

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Spanish edition.

Born in Huesca in 1930, Saura's interest in painting and writing would surface during convalescence from a long boyhood illness. On the occasion of his first exhibition in Madrid in 1951 he published the manifesto "Programio" in the surrealist conception of art exemplified in his works The Marquis of Sade and Adolescent Virgin (1947), or in the series on Constellations. From 1953 to 1955 he settled in Paris where he joined in the activities of the surrealist group and where his work came under the influence of artists such as Miró, Ernest Tanguy and Man Ray.

In 1957, together with several critics and artists like Millares, Feito and Canogar, he founded the "El Paso" group in Madrid, one of the truly avant-garde movements of post-war Spain that supported a new gestural language similar to informalism. Saura was one of the first to utilize the language of abstract expressionism in his Castellana series (1954), whilst at the same time he began his first series in expressionist representational art, which would be the springboard for the work of his mature years.

In his series of imaginary Portraits, Antonio Saura reduced the figure to elemental diagrams. This operation was in keeping with the neo-representational trend of the early sixties, which, without relinquishing the visual findings of informalism, was attempting to restore iconic representation. The imaginary Portrait of Brigitte Bardot, together with those of Felipe II and Rembrandt the Elder, form part of Saura's odd gallery. In 1958 he started working in graphic art and in 1964 he stopped painting on canvas for an extensive period, devoting himself entirely to works on paper. Part of these could be appreciated in the retrospective exhibition that the Casa de la Moneda Museum dedicated to this artist. Returning to oils, he painted the Dora Maar series (1983) and a set of large canvases including Initiation to creation (1985). Saura was also an art scholar who analyzed the work of Goya obsessively (particularly The Dog which graced one of the walls in the Quinta del Sordo), a figure on which he did studies and series time and again.

Saura's artistic career was marked with awards such as the Guggenheim Award (1960), the Carnegie Award (1964), the designation of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters from the French Ministry of Culture (1981), the gold medal of the city from the Town Council of Huesca (1982) and the Aragon Goya Award (1996) that was conferred on him in its first edition by the Aragonese government. He died in Cuenca in 1998.

[22 x 27.5 cm, 294 p., illustrations, col.]

Spanish edition.

Born in Huesca in 1930, Saura's interest in painting and writing would surface during convalescence from a long boyhood illness. On the occasion of his first exhibition in Madrid in 1951 he published the manifesto "Programio" in the surrealist conception of art exemplified in his works The Marquis of Sade and Adolescent Virgin (1947), or in the series on Constellations. From 1953 to 1955 he settled in Paris where he joined in the activities of the surrealist group and where his work came under the influence of artists such as Miró, Ernest Tanguy and Man Ray.

In 1957, together with several critics and artists like Millares, Feito and Canogar, he founded the "El Paso" group in Madrid, one of the truly avant-garde movements of post-war Spain that supported a new gestural language similar to informalism. Saura was one of the first to utilize the language of abstract expressionism in his Castellana series (1954), whilst at the same time he began his first series in expressionist representational art, which would be the springboard for the work of his mature years.

In his series of imaginary Portraits, Antonio Saura reduced the figure to elemental diagrams. This operation was in keeping with the neo-representational trend of the early sixties, which, without relinquishing the visual findings of informalism, was attempting to restore iconic representation. The imaginary Portrait of Brigitte Bardot, together with those of Felipe II and Rembrandt the Elder, form part of Saura's odd gallery. In 1958 he started working in graphic art and in 1964 he stopped painting on canvas for an extensive period, devoting himself entirely to works on paper. Part of these could be appreciated in the retrospective exhibition that the Casa de la Moneda Museum dedicated to this artist. Returning to oils, he painted the Dora Maar series (1983) and a set of large canvases including Initiation to creation (1985). Saura was also an art scholar who analyzed the work of Goya obsessively (particularly The Dog which graced one of the walls in the Quinta del Sordo), a figure on which he did studies and series time and again.

Saura's artistic career was marked with awards such as the Guggenheim Award (1960), the Carnegie Award (1964), the designation of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters from the French Ministry of Culture (1981), the gold medal of the city from the Town Council of Huesca (1982) and the Aragon Goya Award (1996) that was conferred on him in its first edition by the Aragonese government. He died in Cuenca in 1998.

[22 x 27.5 cm, 294 p., illustrations, col.]